• +264 (0) 67 304566
  • info@africat.org
  • Mon - Fri: 9:00 - 18:30

Sponsor a Cheetah

MAKE A DIFFERENCE 

Part of AfriCat’s mission is to protect and conserve the elegant and rare Cheetah – and now YOU can join our AfriCat family, and be part of this hugely important work!!

Wherever you are, you can join us in the battle to protect this incredible creature from extinction.

If, like us, you feel that wild animals are just as important to our world as us humans, and you feel that it is our responsibility to take action to ensure that we protect all of it, we invite you to MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

By sponsoring one of our sleek, athletic Cheetah, you will be helping us fund our essential Cheetah-programme at AfriCat HQ in the Okonjima Nature Reserve, our oh-so-important environmental educational programmes, our stock and park-management initiatives with local farmers, and all the vital elements that go into helping these Cheetah survive – EVERY PENNY COUNTS – and now YOU are on that front line too! 

 

A PURRRRfect Gift:

Sponsor one of our captive or, rehabilitated, free-roaming Cheetah, and the certificates you receive, make wonderful gifts for Birthdays or Festivals, Graduation gifts, Mothers’ & Fathers’ Day!

When you Sponsor a Cheetah you’ll become one of the AfriCat Family members and you will get:

  • Regular AfriCat updates on our fb, Instagram or twitter page, reminding you of the cause you support
  • Photos of your magnificent Cheetah
  • A personalized certificate of the Cheetah you are supporting

Your sponsored Cheetah may be temporarily living at AfriCat’s Carnivore Care Centre, or in the 200km² Okonjima Nature Reserve.

WHY?

Some Fast Facts to help crystalize why their place in the world is so unique, and why their survival is imperative:

  • They weigh between 20 – 72 kg
  • They are about 1 – 1.5m from nose to tail
  • The maximum-recorded life span in the wild is 11 -14 years for a female and 7 – 10 years for a male. (dependent on density of other apex predators)
  • They have a gestation period of 3 months.
  • One of the most specialized of the 37 cat species; it is the fastest land animal in the world!
  • It is able to reach tops speeds of 100 -113km/hr in just 3 – 6 seconds. (depending on age and fitness level)
  • Its long muscular tail has a flat shape and functions as a rudder to help it control steering and balance as they run.
  • It has Semi non-retractable claws (like a dog) which work like cleats on a football shoe to give traction when running.
  • Its paws are hard like rubber to help grip the ground when running… unlike the soft paws of a cat.
  • The long black ‘tear marks’ which run down from the inside corners of their eyes to the outside edge of the mouth help reflect the sun’s glare when they hunt in the day.
  • The ‘tear marks’ also work like sights on a rifle to help the Cheetah ‘aim’ and stay focused on their prey when hunting and running.
  • Their black spotted fur grows out of black spotted skin!
  • When running at full speed, their stride is approximately 6-8 meters.
  • They kill their prey by chasing it down and then bite its throat that acts to suffocate it by cutting off the air supply.
  • Their prey are the smaller antelope like Springbok, Steenbok, Thomson’s Gazelle, Dik-Dik, young Oryx, -Kudu, -Hartebeest -calves, Zebra foals, young warthog and Duiker.
  • Cheetah cubs have a special way of keeping them safe from threats like Lion and Hyeana – they have a long “mantle” of hair which sticks up from their neck to their tail, helping them to blend in with the long grasses in which they live.
  • As cubs are very vulnerable to attack, and often don’t survive the first year, the mothers tend to have many cubs – between 2 and 6 per litter.
  • Their predators are large Eagles (can take cubs), Humans, Leopard, Lion, Wild Dog and Hyaena.
  • Estimated population of free-roaming Cheetahs in Africa in 2018 is 7000 in Africa and 100 in Asia.
  • Their Conservation Status is “Vulnerable”
  • Currently they inhabit 10% of their historic range.

 

 

An extraordinary animal by all measures... This athletic sprinter needs your help!!! Help us tackle the problems they face...

Sponsorship/Adoption Fee

Sponsor one of our Cheetah for 1 year: N$ 2,500 / U$ 300 / £ 200 / € 250

The adoption fee covers the cost of food and basic veterinary care.

DOWNLOAD OUR ADOPTION/SPONSORSHIP FORM HERE

 

Remember, when you Sponsor a Cheetah you will receive: 

  • Photos of your Cheetah
  • A personalized certificate of the Cheetah you are supporting
  • Regular AfriCat updates via fb, Instagram and Twitter, reminding you of the important cause you support 

The PURRRfect Gift, and the perfect PURRRING reason!

Feel good that you have not only celebrated with someone, but you have also put your money where your  mouth is……

YOU ARE NOW PART OF THE ‘CARNIVORE FAMILY’ WHO CARE ENOUGH TO DO SOMETHING ABOUT OUR WILDLIFE TODAY!

MAKE A DIFFERENCE, BE A PART OF LOOKING AFTER OUR WORLD!!!

NAME: Abbey

GENDER: Female

AGE: (2018) 15 years

WEIGHT: (2013) 33.5 kg | (2014) 32.8 kg | (2015) 40.4 kg | (2016) 40.7 kg | (2017) 35.7 kg | (2018) 32.8 kg

ORIGIN: Okahandja

SIBLINGS: None

COMPANIONS IN ENCLOSURE: Bubbles and Curly.

REASON FOR CAPTIVITY: Abbey, TinTin and Mulder were returned to the AfriCat Care Centre after an unsuccessful rehabilitation trial programme in 2010 / 2011. Captive reared, rehabilitated BUT UNSUCCESSFUL – now too habituated and old for re-release.

 Abbey is one of our cheetah ambassadors at AfriCat’s Carnivore Care Centre.

Mulder, Tintin and Abbey were orphaned at the age of six months when their mother was shot. They were released into the rehab park on 25 Oct 2010, but were unsuccessful after ‘Scully’ their sibling was killed by a warthog and Mulder was stabbed in the chest by an Eland. They were the oldest of the cheetahs that were released into the reserve – their teeth are in excellent condition for their age. Tintin was the more dominant, but perhaps held back by the rest. They will remain at AfriCat as ambassadors as they are too habituated to be re-released again. Abbey and Mulder are inseparable and are always found together.

NAME: Peanut

GENDER: Male

AGE: (2018) 10 years

WEIGHT: (2013) 45.7 kg | (2014) 46.7 kg | (2015) 48.9 kg | (2016) 42 kg | (2017) 44.7 kg | (2018) 42.8 kg

ORIGIN: Omaruru

SIBLINGS / RELATIONS: Raisin

COMPANIONS IN ENCLOSURE: Raisin

REASON FOR CAPTIVITY: Soon to be released if not too habituated. Peanut and his brother Raisin will remain in AfriCat’s care until space opens in the Okonjima Nature Reserve for their rehabilitation to start.

 Peanut is one of our cheetahs at AfriCat’s Carnivore Care Centre.

Peanut and his brother Raisin came to AfriCat when they were around a year old. They had been captured from the wild without their mother and then kept in captivity for around six months. The farm where they were being kept was sold and the new owners didn’t want them anymore and therefore contacted AfriCat to come and fetch them. They couldn’t be released onto farmland as they were too young and too habituated at the time.

NAME: Curly

GENDER: Female

AGE: (2018) 15 years

WEIGHT: (2013) 29.6 kg | (2014) 31.1 kg | (2015) 32.1 kg | (2016) 31.2 kg | (2017) 29.8 kg | (2018) 30.8 kg

ORIGIN: Windhoek

SIBLINGS: None

COMPANIONS IN ENCLOSURE: Bubbles and Abbey

REASON FOR CAPTIVITY: Captive reared, habituated and now too old for release.

Curly is one of our cheetah ambassadors at AfriCat’s Carnivore Care Centre.
Curly has been at AfriCat since she was a two-month-old cub. She was caught by hand and her mother and siblings managed to get away. Being orphaned at an early age, Curly was unable to be released. Shortly after her arrival, several young cubs came into our care and we introduced them to Curly. Curly and Bubbles are always together! Curly is the more feminine of the two, with the pretty face! During our 2014 Annual Health-check, a large abdominal foreign granuloma was found inside Curly and was laparoscopicly removed, using a single incision laparoscopic surgery and successfully extracted. This was the first case report of a torn-induced abdominal foreign body, removed with minimal invasive surgery in a wild African carnivore.

 

NAME: Nip

GENDER: Female

AGE: (2018) 8 years

WEIGHT: (2013) 32.2 kg | (2014) 33.4 kg | (2015) 31.5 kg | (2016) 31.3 kg | (2017) 35.3 kg | (2018) 35.3 kg

ORIGIN: Otjiwarongo

SIBLINGS / RELATIONS: Savanna, Scamp and Tuc

COMPANIONS IN ENCLOSURE: Savanna, Scamp, Tuc and Sam.

REASON FOR CAPTIVITY: Soon to be released if not too habituated. Nip and her group of friends will remain in AfriCat’s care until space opens in the Okonjima Nature Reserve for their rehabilitation to start.

Nip is one of our cheetahs at AfriCat’s Rehabilitation Centre.

Nip and her sister Savanna and her two brothers, Tuc and Scamp were found on the perimeter fenceline of the Okonjima Nature Reserve (2010). They were observed for a few days until it was obvious there was no mother around and attempts were made to catch them. They were around three months old when they came to AfriCat.

NAME: Raisin

GENDER: Male

AGE: (2018) 10 years

WEIGHT: (2013) 38 kg | (2014) 41 kg | (2015) 40.1 kg | (2016) 44.1 kg | (2017) 44.7 kg | (2018) 42.8 kg

ORIGIN: Omaruru

SIBLINGS / RELATIONS: Peanut

COMPANIONS IN ENCLOSURE: Peanut

REASON FOR CAPTIVITY: Soon to be released if not too habituated. Raisin and his brother Peanut will remain in AfriCat’s care until space opens in the Okonjima Nature Reserve for their rehabilitation to start.

Raisin is one of our cheetahs at AfriCat’s Carnivore Care Centre.

Raisin and his brother Peanut arrived at AfriCat at a year old. They had been captured from the wild without their mother and then kept for around six months. The farm where they were being kept was sold and the new owners didn’t want them anymore and therefore contacted AfriCat to come and fetch them. They couldn’t be released onto farmland as they were too young and too habituated. Raisin has a very distinct, moon-like face about him – round and cuddly-cute.

NAME: Tuc

GENDER: Male

AGE: (2018) 8 years

WEIGHT: (2013) 41.5 kg | (2014) 41.1 kg | 2015) 41.1 kg | (2016) 44.5 kg | (2017) 44.9 kg | (2018) 47.0 kg

ORIGIN: Otjiwarongo

SIBLINGS / RELATIONS: Savanna, Scamp and Nip

COMPANIONS IN ENCLOSURE: Savanna, Scamp, Nip and Sam.

REASON FOR CAPTIVITY: Soon to be released if not too habituated. Tuc and his group of friends will remain in AfriCat’s care until space opens in the Okonjima Nature Reserve for their rehabilitation to start.

Tuc is one of our cheetahs at AfriCat’s Rehabilitation Centre.

Tuc and his brother Scamp and his sisters, Savanna and Nip were found on the perimeter fence-line of the Okonjima Nature Reserve (2010). They were observed for a few days until it was obvious there was no mother around and attempts were made to catch them. They were around three months old when they came to AfriCat. Tuc is the largest male in the group.

NAME: Savanna

GENDER: Female

AGE: (2018) 8 years

WEIGHT: (2013) 36.2 kg | (2014) 35 kg | (2015) 35.1 kg | (2016) 35.9 kg | (2017) 36.0 kg | (2018) 41.8 kg

ORIGIN: Otjiwarongo

SIBLINGS / RELATIONS: Scamp, Nip and Tuc

COMPANIONS IN ENCLOSURE: Scamp, Nip, Tuc and Sam.

REASON FOR CAPTIVITY: Soon to be released if not too habituated. Savanna and her group of friends will remain in AfriCat’s care until space opens in the Okonjima Nature Reserve for their rehabilitation to start.

Savanna is one of our cheetahs at AfriCat’s Rehabilitation Centre.

Savanna and her sister Nip, and her two brothers Tuc and Scamp were found on the perimeter fenceline of the Okonjima Nature Reserve (2010). They were observed for a few days until it was obvious there was no mother around and attempts were made to catch them. They were around three months old when they came to AfriCat. Savanna is the larger female in the group.

NAME: Bubbles

GENDER: Male

AGE: (2018) 15 years

WEIGHT: (2013) 38.2 kg | (2014) 39.3 kg | (2015) 35.9 kg | (2016) 36.2 kg | (2017) 33.3 kg | (2018) 34.6 kg

ORIGIN: Windhoek

SIBLINGS: None

COMPANIONS IN ENCLOSURE: Curly and Abbey

REASON FOR CAPTIVITY: Captive reared, habituated and now too old for release.

Bubbles is one of our cheetah ambassadors at AfriCat’s Carnivore Care Centre.
Bubbles has been at AfriCat since he was a six-month-old cub. He was saved by a farmer after his mother had been shot. He spent three months at the farm before we were asked to come and fetch him. At the time we already had cheetah cubs of a similar age called Buttons and Curly and introductions to the existing group was very easy and they soon became good friends. Bubbles and Curly are always together and are best friends forever!

NAME: Dune

GENDER: Female

AGE: (2018) 4 years

WEIGHT: (2016) 33.5 kg | (2017) 34.1 kg | (2018) 32.6 kg

ORIGIN: Walvis Bay, Namib Desert, near Dune 7

Rehabilitated into the Okonjima Nature Reserve

Dune is the newest member of the AfriCat Foundation. She was found together with her brother in May 2015 close to Dune 7 near Walvis Bay. The two 4 – 5 months old cubs were severely dehydrated and in poor condition and shortly after they were detected for the first time the male cub died due to starvation and dehydration. The local vet Dr. Hartmut Winterbach was able to dart Dune, who subsequently was brought into the care of the SPCA Swakopmund. Three days later she was collected by the AfriCat Team and placed alongside  Nyx – Dizzy’s cub – who had to recover from a tibia and pelvis fracture. Dune and Nyx became close friends and it was amazing to watch how these two lonesome cheetahs kept each other company.

In June 2015 Nyx died unexpectedly due to complications with his pelvis fracture and Dune had to face the third great loss in her short life. Dune is very relaxed around human company, unlike Swakop and Mundi who have stayed very wild and untrusting?!  Dune’s general body condition improved rapidly and she has always had a good appetite.

Dune has joined our Cheetah Rehabilitation Program in the Okonjima Nature Reserve on the 10th October 2018.

NAME: Hoover

GENDER: Female

AGE: (2018) 14 years

WEIGHT: (2013) 34.4 kg | (2014) 33.5 kg | (2015) 36.1 kg | (2016) 36.5 kg | (2017) 34.2 kg | (2018) 36.7 kg

ORIGIN: Omaruru

SIBLINGS: Dyson (brother)

COMPANIONS IN ENCLOSURE: Dyson

REASON FOR CAPTIVITY: Captive reared, habituated and now too old for release.

Hoover is one of our cheetah AMBASSADORS at AfriCat’s Carnivore Care Centre.

Hoover and her sister Vax and brother Dyson, came to AfriCat when they were just eight weeks old and their mother had been shot for killing a kudu calf. Even after their traumatic experience they settled down quite quickly and had absolutely no problem taking to food. They demolished whatever was given to them in a matter of minutes – hence them being named after vacuum cleaners. Hoover is the darkest cheetah @ AfriCat and has the thickest, black tearmarks. Darker than with most cheetahs.

Some cheetahs have a rare fur pattern mutation of larger, blotchy, merged spots. Known as “king cheetahs”, they were once thought to constitute a separate subspecies but are in fact African cheetahs; their unusual fur pattern is the result of a single recessive gene. In 2012, the cause of this alternative ‘coat pattern’ was found to be a mutation in the gene for transmembrane aminopeptidase Q (Taqpep), the same gene responsible for the striped “mackerel” versus blotchy “classic” patterning seen in tabby cats.[34] The mutation is recessive, which is one reason the pattern is so rare. Although Hoover and her brother, Dyson are not ‘King’ cheetahs, and do not have the pattern mutation, they do have the rare, darker than usual colouring – which makes them both ‘uniquely darker’ than any other cheetah we have seen at AfriCat.

NAME: Scamp

GENDER: Male

AGE: (2018) 8 years

WEIGHT: (2013) 40.7 kg | (2014) 40.9 kg | (2015) 42.5 kg | (2016) 45.2 kg | (2017) 45.3 kg | (2018) 45.9 kg

ORIGIN: Otjiwarongo

SIBLINGS / RELATIONS: Savanna, Nip and Tuc

COMPANIONS IN ENCLOSURE: Savanna, Nip, Tuc and Sam.

REASON FOR CAPTIVITY: Soon to be released if not too habituated. Scamp and his group of friends will remain in AfriCat’s care until space opens in the Okonjima Nature Reserve for their rehabilitation to start.

Scamp is one of our cheetahs at AfriCat’s Rehabilitation Centre.

Scamp and his sisters Savanna and Nip and his brother Tuc were found on the perimeter fenceline of the Okonjima Nature Reserve (2010). They were observed for a few days until it was obvious there was no mother around and attempts were made to catch them. They were around three months old when they came to AfriCat.

NAME: Dyson

GENDER: Male

AGE: (2018) 14 years

WEIGHT: (2013) 41.1 kg | (2014) 40.5 kg | (2015) 39.6 kg | (2016) 36.9 kg | (2017) 36.3 kg | (2018) 38.1 kg

ORIGIN: Omaruru

SIBLINGS: Hoover

COMPANIONS IN ENCLOSURE: Hoover

REASON FOR CAPTIVITY: Captive reared, habituated and now too old for release.

Dyson is one of our cheetah AMBASSADORS at AfriCat’s Carnivore Care Centre.

Dyson and his two sisters, Hoover and Vax came to AfriCat when they were just eight weeks old and their mother had been shot for killing a kudu calf. Even after their traumatic experience they settled down quite quickly and had absolutely no problem taking to food. They demolished whatever was given to them in a matter of minutes – hence them being named after vacuum cleaners. Dyson and his siblings are the ‘darkest’ cheetahs residing at the AfriCat Care Centre.

Some cheetahs have a rare fur pattern mutation of larger, blotchy, merged spots. Known as “king cheetahs”, they were once thought to constitute a separate subspecies but are in fact African cheetahs; their unusual fur pattern is the result of a single recessive gene. In 2012, the cause of this alternative ‘coat pattern’ was found to be a mutation in the gene for transmembrane aminopeptidase Q (Taqpep), the same gene responsible for the striped “mackerel” versus blotchy “classic” patterning seen in tabby cats.[34] The mutation is recessive, which is one reason the pattern is so rare. Although DYSON and his last remaining sibling, Hoover are not ‘King’ cheetahs, and do not have the pattern mutation, they do have the rare, darker than usual colouring – which makes them both ‘uniquely darker’ than any other cheetah we have seen at AfriCat.

NAME: Mundi

GENDER: Female

AGE: (2018) 5 years

WEIGHT: (2014) 28.8 kg | (2015) 37.6 kg | (2016) 35.2 kg | (2017) 35.2 kg | (2018) 35.4 kg

ORIGIN: Swakopmund

 RELEASED INTO THE OKONJIMA NATURE RESERVE: May 2017

Mundi is one of our rehabilitated cheetahs in The Okonjima Nature Reserve. Mundi and her brother Swakop came to AfriCat when they were about six to seven months old. At the end of November 2013 Dr. H. Winterbach and Dr. D. Rodenwoldt from Swakopmund Veterinary Clinic, received a phone call about two cheetah cubs that were found near the salt works on the outskirts of Swakopmund. Employees had found them on their way home from work. 

When the vet team arrived, both cubs were darted instantly. Weakened from severe dehydration and malnourishment they didn’t even put up a fight. AfriCat was contacted for help and on the Friday we sent a team to Swakopmund to check on the cats. Their age was estimated between 6 and 7 months, both weighing only around 11 kilogram. After 24 hours of observations they were back on their feet, eating and drinking on their own. 

Three days later the cheetah siblings were collected by Team AfriCat and brought back to Okonjima where they were released into a small hold-over enclosure for the first few days for close-up monitoring. After a week the cats were relocated into a larger camp with natural vegetation providing a safe and stress-free environment. 

Swakop and Mundi – who evidently were named after their origin – have grown into two beautiful cats, who enjoy each other’s company the most.

Mundi and her brother Swakop were released into Okonjima’s private nature reserve in May 2017. Since the death of her brother in May 2018, Mundi is roaming the wild on her own.

NAME: Spitfire

GENDER: Male

AGE: (2018) 8 years

WEIGHT: (2013) 48.5 kg | (2014) 51.6 kg | (2015) 50.6 kg | (2016) 45.7 kg | (2017) 42.2 kg | (2018) 38.7 kg

ORIGIN: Otavi

COMPANION: Sniper

RELEASED INTO THE OKONJIMA NATURE RESERVE: 1 December 2016

Spitfire is one of our rehabilitated cheetahs in The Okonjima Nature Reserve.

Spitfire came to AfriCat when they were three months old. His mother was shot and the young cub was caught by the farmer. He kept him for three weeks wanting to tame them but then heard about AfriCat and contacted us to come and fetch them. Spitfire is the biggest cat at AfriCat. Together with his companion Sniper they are roaming free in the 20 000 ha Okonjima Nature Reserve since December 2016.

NAME: Sniper

GENDER: Male

AGE: (2018) 8 years

WEIGHT: (2013) 34.5 kg | (2014) 34.8 kg | (2015) 35.1 kg | (2016) 35.1 kg | (2017) 28.3 kg | (2018) 25.9 kg

ORIGIN: Otavi

COMPANION: Spitfire

RELEASED INTO THE OKONJIMA NATURE RESERVE: 1 December 2016

Sniper is one of our rehabilitated cheetahs in The Okonjima Nature Reserve.

The origins of this cheetah are unknown. The person who contacted AfriCat got the cheetah from someone else who apparently tried to tame it and tied it to a tree so that it wouldn’t run away. Don’t know how true this story is. Sniper was very overweight when he arrived and had to go on a diet. He started off being very fussy about what he ate but soon adapted to the new food and environment. A few months after his arrival, we introduced him to Quattro, Spitfire and Hurricane. Sniper just steals your heart for he has this round, cute face and is smaller than his friends. Together with his companion Spitfire they are roaming free in the 20 000 ha Okonjima Nature Reserve since December 2016.

NAME: Harley

GENDER: Male

AGE: (2018) 10 years

WEIGHT: (2013) 46.7 kg | (2014) 47.1 kg | (2015) 48.5 kg | (2016) 44.4 kg | (2017) 44.3 kg | (2018) 44.2 kg

ORIGIN: Windhoek

RELEASED INTO THE OKONJIMA NATURE RESERVE: 16 September 2015

 Harley is one of our rehabilitated cheetahs in The Okonjima Nature Reserve.

Harley and his sisters, Ducati and Aprilia, dubbed “The Motorbikes” came to AfriCat at the age of 5 months. Their mother was shot and after the farmer caught them they were kept in a chicken cage for four weeks. When they arrived at AfriCat they all showed signs of a calcium deficiency, skew legs, limps, etc. but after getting the right food with lots of vitamin and mineral supplements they are all walking normally. The three siblings remained in AfriCat’s care until they were old enough to be rehabilitated and released into the wild in September 2015. Harley is the biggest cat in this group and according to his weight and measurements – the second biggest cheetah at AfriCat.

NAME: Sam

GENDER: Male

AGE: (2018) 8 years

WEIGHT: (2013) 33.1 kg | (2014) 34.4 kg | (2015) 33.6 kg | (2016) 35.2 kg | (2017) 37.2 kg | (2018) 36.5 kg

ORIGIN: Windhoek

SIBLINGS / RELATIONS: None

COMPANIONS IN ENCLOSURE: Savanna, Scamp, Nip and Tuc.

REASON FOR CAPTIVITY: Soon to be released if not too habituated. Sam and his group of friends will remain in AfriCat’s care until space opens in the Okonjima Nature Reserve for their rehabilitation to start.

Sam is one of our cheetahs at AfriCat’s Rehabilitation Centre.

Sam and Nick came from the Rhino Park Veterinary Clinic in Windhoek when they were 2 months old. Someone was attempting to hand-rear them in a house in Windhoek but from receiving the incorrect diet they became ill. Nick had a perforated intestine but after they were nursed back to health at the clinic they came to AfriCat. Nick sadly developed septicaemia and died shortly after arriving at AfriCat. Sam is about 6 months younger than his new family of siblings. Sam looks completely different, is slightly smaller and darker – but dominant and the leader of this group

Close Menu